WoRMS taxon details

Lumbricus Linnaeus, 1758

154885  (urn:lsid:marinespecies.org:taxname:154885)

accepted
Genus
Enterion Savigny, 1822 (superfluous replacement name for Lumbricus)

Species Lumbricus arenarius Müller, 1776 accepted as Clitellio (Clitellio) arenarius (Müller, 1776) (superseded original combination)
Species Lumbricus echiurus Pallas, 1766 accepted as Echiurus echiurus (Pallas, 1766) (superseded original combination)
Species Lumbricus lineatus Müller, 1774 accepted as Lumbricillus lineatus (Müller, 1774) (Synonym)
Species Lumbricus marinus Linnaeus, 1758 accepted as Arenicola marina (Linnaeus, 1758) (superseded original combination)
Species Lumbricus minutus Müller, 1776 accepted as Lumbricillus minutus (Müller, 1776) (Synonym)
Species Lumbricus thalassema Pallas, 1774 accepted as Thalassema thalassema (Pallas, 1774) (superseded original combination)
Species Lumbricus tubifex Müller, 1774 accepted as Tubifex tubifex (Müller, 1774) (Synonym)
marine, fresh, terrestrial
Linnaeus, C. (1758). Systema Naturae per regna tria naturae, secundum classes, ordines, genera, species, cum characteribus, differentiis, synonymis, locis. <em>Editio decima, reformata [10th revised edition], vol. 1: 824 pp. Laurentius Salvius: Holmiae.</em> , available online at https://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/726886 [details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 
Homonymy Lumbricus has been used for centuries as a vernacular name to refer to various worms, including intestinal worms. Later...  
Homonymy Lumbricus has been used for centuries as a vernacular name to refer to various worms, including intestinal worms. Later Lumbricus terrestris for earthworms was used by Aldrovandi in 1602, and others subsequently, before the start of Code-recognised Linnaean taxonomy in 1758. Linnaeus (1758) used Lumbricus for Lumbricus terrestris and L marinus (now Arenicola marina). Later Lumbricus continued to be used in a loose manner by others for a variety of worms not earthworms. One of these was Lumbricus echiurus Pallas (1766), now in echiurans as Echiurus echiurus (Pallas, 1766). In a later work Pallas added two sipunculans, as Lumbricus phalloides Pallas, 1774, and Lumbricus thalassema Pallas, 1774. So he had two major subgroups of annelids shoehorned into the Linnaeus earthworm genus Lumbricus. Nomenclator Zoologicus includes a 'Lumbricus Pallas 1766' as a homonym to Lumbricus Linnaeus, but this seems at odds with Pallas's likely intention. He was well aware of the Linnaean genus Lumbricus with its long historic usage, and would have used another name if he had intended to create a new genus. Pallas was using the Linnaean genus. At best this usage could be referred to as "Lumbricus Linnaeus 1758, sensu Pallas 1766, but he mixed two lineages of worms in it. [details]
WoRMS (2020). Lumbricus Linnaeus, 1758. Accessed at: https://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=154885 on 2020-12-01
Date
action
by
2005-04-20 12:27:09Z
created
2010-04-20 12:15:16Z
checked
2020-04-09 22:04:25Z
changed

Creative Commons License The webpage text is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License


original description Linnaeus, C. (1758). Systema Naturae per regna tria naturae, secundum classes, ordines, genera, species, cum characteribus, differentiis, synonymis, locis. <em>Editio decima, reformata [10th revised edition], vol. 1: 824 pp. Laurentius Salvius: Holmiae.</em> , available online at https://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/726886 [details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 

original description  (of Enterion Savigny, 1822) Savigny, Jules-César. (1822). Système des annélides, principalement de celles des côtes de l'Égypte et de la Syrie, offrant les caractères tant distinctifs que naturels des Ordres, Familles et Genres, avec la Description des Espèces. <em>Description de l'Égypte ou Recueil des Observations et des Recherches qui ont été faites en Égypte pendant l'Expédition de l'Armée Française, publié par les Ordres de sa Majesté l'Empereur Napoléon le Grand, Histoire Naturelle, Paris.</em> 1(3):1–128., available online at http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/41329897
page(s): 103; note: erected for Lumbricus terrestris Linnaeus. Enterion terrestre is Savigny's new combination name, not a new species. [details]  OpenAccess publication 

additional source Linnaeus, C. (1753). Species plantarum, exhibentes plantas rite cognitas ad genera relatas cum differentiis specificis, nominibus trivialibus, synonymis selectis, locis natalibus, secundum systema sexuale digestas. Stockholm., available online at https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/bibliography/669#/summary
page(s): 647 [details]   
 
 Present  Inaccurate  Introduced: alien  Containing type locality 
From editor or global species database
Habitat A genus of “classical” earthworms never living in marine environments. [details]

Homonymy Lumbricus has been used for centuries as a vernacular name to refer to various worms, including intestinal worms. Later Lumbricus terrestris for earthworms was used by Aldrovandi in 1602, and others subsequently, before the start of Code-recognised Linnaean taxonomy in 1758. Linnaeus (1758) used Lumbricus for Lumbricus terrestris and L marinus (now Arenicola marina). Later Lumbricus continued to be used in a loose manner by others for a variety of worms not earthworms. One of these was Lumbricus echiurus Pallas (1766), now in echiurans as Echiurus echiurus (Pallas, 1766). In a later work Pallas added two sipunculans, as Lumbricus phalloides Pallas, 1774, and Lumbricus thalassema Pallas, 1774. So he had two major subgroups of annelids shoehorned into the Linnaeus earthworm genus Lumbricus. Nomenclator Zoologicus includes a 'Lumbricus Pallas 1766' as a homonym to Lumbricus Linnaeus, but this seems at odds with Pallas's likely intention. He was well aware of the Linnaean genus Lumbricus with its long historic usage, and would have used another name if he had intended to create a new genus. Pallas was using the Linnaean genus. At best this usage could be referred to as "Lumbricus Linnaeus 1758, sensu Pallas 1766, but he mixed two lineages of worms in it. [details]