WoRMS taxon details

Ainudrilus gibsoni Erséus, 1990

475560  (urn:lsid:marinespecies.org:taxname:475560)

accepted
Species
marine
Erséus, C. (1990). Marine Oligochaeta of Hong Kong. <em>In: Morton B, editor. Proceedings of the Second International Marine Biological Workshop: The Marine Flora and Fauna of Hong Kong and Southern China. The Marine flora and fauna of Hong Kong and southern china II. Hong Kong University Press, Hong Kong.</em> 1: 259-335. [details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 
Holotype  BMNH 1987.3.1, verbatimGeounit Inner end of...  
Holotype BMNH 1987.3.1, verbatimGeounit Inner end of mangrov... [details]
Etymology The species is named for Dr Ray Gibson (Liverpool.Polytechnic, Liverpool) who collected the sample at Ting Kok  
Etymology The species is named for Dr Ray Gibson (Liverpool.Polytechnic, Liverpool) who collected the sample at Ting Kok [details]

Taxonomic remark This species was originally decribed from an intertidal mangrove site in Hong Kong (Erséus, 1990), but never before...  
Taxonomic remark This species was originally decribed from an intertidal mangrove site in Hong Kong (Erséus, 1990), but never before recorded from Australia. The Australian material differs from the type specimens by its more numerous anterior somatic chaetae (up to five per bundle, as opposed to two or three per bundle), and slightly smaller male ducts and spermathecae. Moreover, all of the penial chaetae of the Dampier worms appear single-pointed, whereas a few such chaetae were bifid (possessing a small upper tooth) in the Hong Kong material (see Erséus, 1990b: figure 1E). For the time being, these differences are regarded as intraspecific. [details]
Timm, T. & Erséus, C. (2020). World List of Marine Oligochaeta. Ainudrilus gibsoni Erséus, 1990. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at: https://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=475560 on 2020-10-31
Date
action
by
2010-05-11 08:20:37Z
created

Creative Commons License The webpage text is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License


original description Erséus, C. (1990). Marine Oligochaeta of Hong Kong. <em>In: Morton B, editor. Proceedings of the Second International Marine Biological Workshop: The Marine Flora and Fauna of Hong Kong and Southern China. The Marine flora and fauna of Hong Kong and southern china II. Hong Kong University Press, Hong Kong.</em> 1: 259-335. [details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 

context source (HKRMS) Erseus, C. (1997). Additional notes on the taxonomy of the marine Oligochaeta of Hong Kong, with a description of a new species of Tubificidae. <em>In: Morton B, editor. Proceedings of the Eighth International Marine Biological Workshop: The Marine Flora and Fauna of Hong Kong and Southern China. The Marine Flora and Fauna of Hong Kong and Southern China IV. Hong Kong University Press, Hong Kong.</em> 37-50., available online at https://lib.hku.hk/Press/9622094376.pdf [details]   

additional source Erséus, C.; Wang, H. (2003). Marine Tubificidae (Oligochaeta) of the Dampier area, Western Australia. <em>In: F.E. Wells, D.J. Walker & D.S. Jones. The marine Flora and Fauna of Dampier, Western Australia. Western Australian Museum, Perth.</em> 363-394., available online at http://benthos.ihb.ac.cn/Ers%C3%A9usWang03Dampier.pdf [details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 
 
 Present  Inaccurate  Introduced: alien  Containing type locality 
 

Holotype BMNH 1987.3.1, verbatimGeounit Inner end of mangrov... [details]
From editor or global species database
Ecology Intertidal sand and gravel. [details]

Ecology Intertidal sandy substrate near mangroves [details]

Etymology The species is named for Dr Ray Gibson (Liverpool.Polytechnic, Liverpool) who collected the sample at Ting Kok [details]

Taxonomic remark This species was originally decribed from an intertidal mangrove site in Hong Kong (Erséus, 1990), but never before recorded from Australia. The Australian material differs from the type specimens by its more numerous anterior somatic chaetae (up to five per bundle, as opposed to two or three per bundle), and slightly smaller male ducts and spermathecae. Moreover, all of the penial chaetae of the Dampier worms appear single-pointed, whereas a few such chaetae were bifid (possessing a small upper tooth) in the Hong Kong material (see Erséus, 1990b: figure 1E). For the time being, these differences are regarded as intraspecific. [details]