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Marchini, A.; Ferrario, J.; Sfriso, A.; Occhipinti-Ambrogi, A. (2015). Current status and trends of biological invasions in the Lagoon of Venice, a hotspot of marine NIS introductions in the Mediterranean Sea. Biological Invasions.
198222
10.1007/s10530-015-0922-3 [view]
Marchini, A.; Ferrario, J.; Sfriso, A.; Occhipinti-Ambrogi, A.
2015
Current status and trends of biological invasions in the Lagoon of Venice, a hotspot of marine NIS introductions in the Mediterranean Sea
Biological Invasions
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This paper provides an updated account of the occurrence and abundance of non-indigenous species (NIS) in an area of high risk of introduction: the Lagoon of Venice (Italy). This site is a known hotspot of NIS introductions within the Mediterranean Sea, hosting all the most important vectors of introduction of marine NIS—shipping, recreational boating, shellfish culture and live seafood trade. The recent literature demonstrates that the number of NIS in Venice is continuously changing, because new species are being introduced or identified, and new evidence shows either an exotic origin of species previously believed to be native, or a native origin of formerly believed “aliens”, or demonstrates the cryptogenic nature of others. The number of NIS introduced in the Venetian lagoon currently totals 71, out of which 55 are established. This number exceeds those displayed by some nations like Finland, Portugal or Libya. Macroalgae are the taxonomic group with the highest number of introduced species (41 % of NIS): the most likely vector for their introduction is shellfish culture. The source region of NIS introduced to Venice is mainly represented by other Mediterranean or European sites (76 %). The Lagoon of Venice represents a sink but also a source of NIS in the Mediterranean Sea, as it is the site of first record of several NIS, which have since further spread elsewhere.
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2015-07-09 23:26:56Z
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Acartia tonsa Dana, 1849 represented as Acartia (Acanthacartia) tonsa Dana, 1849 (additional source)
Agardhiella subulata (C.Agardh) Kraft & M.J.Wynne, 1979 (additional source)
Amphibalanus eburneus (Gould, 1841) (additional source)
Anadara transversa (Say, 1822) (additional source)
Bonnemaisonia hamifera Hariot, 1891 (additional source)
Callinectes sapidus Rathbun, 1896 (additional source)
Codium fragile subsp. fragile (Suringar) Hariot, 1889 (additional source)
Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg, 1793) represented as Magallana gigas (Thunberg, 1793) (additional source)
Diadumene lineata (Verrill, 1869) (additional source)
Dyspanopeus sayi (Smith, 1869) (additional source)
Garveia franciscana (Torrey, 1902) accepted as Calyptospadix cerulea Clarke, 1882 (additional source)
Halothrix lumbricalis (Kützing) Reinke, 1888 (additional source)
Hydroides dianthus (Verrill, 1873) (additional source)
Leathesia marina (Lyngbye) Decaisne, 1842 (additional source)
Littorina saxatilis (Olivi, 1792) (additional source)
Neosiphonia harveyi (Bailey) M.-S.Kim, H.-G.Choi, Guiry & G.W.Saunders, 2001 accepted as Melanothamnus harveyi (Bailey) Díaz-Tapia & Maggs, 2017 (additional source)
Pyropia yezoensis (Ueda) M.S.Hwang & H.G.Choi, 2011 (additional source)
Rhithropanopeus harrisii (Gould, 1841) (additional source)
Scytosiphon dotyi M.J.Wynne, 1969 (additional source)
Solieria filiformis (Kützing) P.W.Gabrielson, 1985 (additional source)
Ulvaria obscura (Kützing) P.Gayral ex C.Bliding, 1969 (additional source)
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