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Polychaeta name details

Lycaretus Kinberg, 1867

325884  (urn:lsid:marinespecies.org:taxname:325884)

 unaccepted (subjective synonym)
Genus
marine, brackish, fresh, terrestrial
recent only
masculine
Kinberg, Johan Gustaf Hjalmar. (1867). Om regeneration af hufvudet och de främre segmenterna hos en Annulat. <em>Öfversigt af Kongliga Vetenskaps-Akademiens Förhandlingar, Stockholm.</em> 24(2): 53-57., available online at https://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/32326593
page(s): 55 [details]  OpenAccess publication 
Etymology Not stated by the author, probably derived from the Classical Greek and Roman history and mythology, as usual in Kinberg....  
Etymology Not stated by the author, probably derived from the Classical Greek and Roman history and mythology, as usual in Kinberg. The genus is possibly named after Lycaretus, a latinized form of 'Lykaretos', the name of a governor of Lemnos under the Persian dominance who lived in the 6th century BC. He was the brother of Maeandrius, tyrant of Samos, and is referred in Book III, Chapter 153, of Herodotus' Histories: “Maeandrius revolved this circumstance in his mind; and being convinced that if he resigned his power some other would assume it, he determined to continue as he was. Returning to the citadel, he sent for the citizens, as if to give them an account of the monies which had been alluded to, instead of which he seized and confined them. Whilst they remained in imprisonment Meandrius was taken ill; his brother Lycaretus, not thinking he would recover, that he might the more easily succeed in his views upon Samos put the citizens who were confined to death; indeed it did not appear that they were desirous of life under the government of a tyrant.” (From: “The History of Herodotus, translated from the Greek. With notes”, by Rev. William Beloe, London, Leigh and Sotherby, 1791; volume II, page 164). [details]
Read, G.; Fauchald, K. (Ed.) (2019). World Polychaeta database. Lycaretus Kinberg, 1867. Accessed at: http://www.marinespecies.org/polychaeta/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=325884 on 2020-01-17
Date
action
by
2008-03-14 12:50:56Z
created
2008-03-26 11:36:43Z
changed
2010-04-07 22:27:04Z
changed
2019-09-07 11:08:21Z
changed

original description Kinberg, Johan Gustaf Hjalmar. (1867). Om regeneration af hufvudet och de främre segmenterna hos en Annulat. <em>Öfversigt af Kongliga Vetenskaps-Akademiens Förhandlingar, Stockholm.</em> 24(2): 53-57., available online at https://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/32326593
page(s): 55 [details]  OpenAccess publication 

additional source Kinberg, Johan Gustaf Hjalmar. (1867). Om Amphinomernas systematik. <em>Öfversigt af Kongliga Vetenskaps-Akademiens Förhandlingar, Stockholm.</em> 24(3): 83-91., available online at https://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/32326623
page(s): 90 [details]  OpenAccess publication 

source of synonymy Hartman, Olga. (1948). The marine annelids erected by Kinberg. With some notes on some other types in the Swedish State Museum. <em>Arkiv för Zoologi.</em> 42(1): 1-137, & plates 1-18.
page(s): 6, 42; note: with Eurythoe Kinberg, 1857 [details]   
From editor or global species database
Diagnosis Original diagnosis by Kinberg (1867: 55): "Corpus longum, depressum, segmentis rectangulis. Lobus cephalicus rotundatus, carunculo elongato sublaevi, tentaculo, oculis 4. Antennae 2 et palpi 2 a segmento buccali orientes. Branchiae a segmento tertio incipientes. Cirri dorsuales pedis cujusque dorsualis unicus. Setae pedum dorsualium capillares subgeniculatae aliaeque serratae, ventralium bifidae apicibus inaequalibus, laevibus.[details]

Etymology Not stated by the author, probably derived from the Classical Greek and Roman history and mythology, as usual in Kinberg. The genus is possibly named after Lycaretus, a latinized form of 'Lykaretos', the name of a governor of Lemnos under the Persian dominance who lived in the 6th century BC. He was the brother of Maeandrius, tyrant of Samos, and is referred in Book III, Chapter 153, of Herodotus' Histories: “Maeandrius revolved this circumstance in his mind; and being convinced that if he resigned his power some other would assume it, he determined to continue as he was. Returning to the citadel, he sent for the citizens, as if to give them an account of the monies which had been alluded to, instead of which he seized and confined them. Whilst they remained in imprisonment Meandrius was taken ill; his brother Lycaretus, not thinking he would recover, that he might the more easily succeed in his views upon Samos put the citizens who were confined to death; indeed it did not appear that they were desirous of life under the government of a tyrant.” (From: “The History of Herodotus, translated from the Greek. With notes”, by Rev. William Beloe, London, Leigh and Sotherby, 1791; volume II, page 164). [details]