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Polychaeta name details

Serpula incurvata Adams, 1798

437242  (urn:lsid:marinespecies.org:taxname:437242)

 unaccepted (superseded original combination)
Species
marine, brackish, fresh, terrestrial
recent only
Adams, G.; Kanmacher, F. (1798). Essays on the microscope : containing a practical description of the most improved microscopes; a general history of insects, their transformations, peculiar habits, and œconomy : an account of the various species, and singular properties, of the hydræ and vorticellæ: a description of three hundred and eighty-three animalcula : with a concise catalogue of interesting objects: a view of the organization of timber, and the configuration of salts, when under the microscope. <em>[Book].</em> 724 pp. Second edition, by the late George Adams, further edited by Kanmacher., available online at https://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/45704067
page(s): 634; note: "Serpula Incurvata. Fig. 7. S. recta anfractibus tribus contiguis regulariter involutis. The straight horn worm-shell, with three close intorted spires at the tip. The colour white, semitransparent. F...  
"Serpula Incurvata. Fig. 7. S. recta anfractibus tribus contiguis regulariter involutis. The straight horn worm-shell, with three close intorted spires at the tip. The colour white, semitransparent. From Sandwich: rare. "
 [details]   
Read, G.; Fauchald, K. (Ed.) (2019). World Polychaeta database. Serpula incurvata Adams, 1798. Accessed at: http://www.marinespecies.org/polychaeta/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=437242 on 2019-11-20
Date
action
by
2009-12-06 09:34:34Z
created
2016-10-11 21:52:23Z
changed
2018-05-21 05:58:03Z
changed

original description Adams, G.; Kanmacher, F. (1798). Essays on the microscope : containing a practical description of the most improved microscopes; a general history of insects, their transformations, peculiar habits, and œconomy : an account of the various species, and singular properties, of the hydræ and vorticellæ: a description of three hundred and eighty-three animalcula : with a concise catalogue of interesting objects: a view of the organization of timber, and the configuration of salts, when under the microscope. <em>[Book].</em> 724 pp. Second edition, by the late George Adams, further edited by Kanmacher., available online at https://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/45704067
page(s): 634; note: "Serpula Incurvata. Fig. 7. S. recta anfractibus tribus contiguis regulariter involutis. The straight horn worm-shell, with three close intorted spires at the tip. The colour white, semitransparent. F...  
"Serpula Incurvata. Fig. 7. S. recta anfractibus tribus contiguis regulariter involutis. The straight horn worm-shell, with three close intorted spires at the tip. The colour white, semitransparent. From Sandwich: rare. "
 [details]   

additional source Johnston, George 1846. An index to the British Annelides [sic]. Annals and Magazine of Natural History, series 1, 16 (supplement to vol 16): 433-462. Plate 2. , available online at https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/22069506
page(s): 451 [details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 

additional source Turton W. (1802). A General System of Nature, through the three grand Kingdoms of Animals, Vegetables, and Minerals; systematicallydivided into their several classes, orders, genera, species, and varieties, with their habitations, manners, economy, structure,and peculiarities. Translated from Gmelin's last edition of the celebrated Systema Natura, by Sir Charles Linné : Amended andenlarged by the improvements and discoveries of later naturalists and societies, with appropriate copper-pla. <i>Lackington and co. 4 vol.</i>: , available online at http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/83209
page(s): vol. 4: 609; note: Listing with prior authority attributed to Adams (1798) [details]   

source of synonymy Jeffreys J.G. (1862-1869). <i>British conchology</i>. Vol. 1: pp. cxiv + 341 [1862]. Vol. 2: pp. 479 [1864]. Vol. 3: pp. 394 [1865]. Vol. 4: pp. 487 [1867]. Vol. 5: pp. 259 [1869]. London, van Voorst. , available online at http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/55187
page(s): 4: 79 [details]   

new combination reference Montagu, G. (1803). Testacea Britannica or Natural History of British Shells, Marine, Land, and Fresh-Water, Including the Most Minute: Systematically Arranged and Embellished with Figures. J. White, London, Vol. 1, xxxvii + 291 pp;; Vol. 2, pp. 293–606, pl. 1-16., available online at http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/78694
page(s): 518 [details]   

status source ICZN; International Commission of Zoological Nomenclature. (1959). Opinion 558. Rejection for nomenclatorial purposes of the work entitled "Testacea minuta rariora" by William Boys as augmented by George Walker published in 1784. <em>Opinions and Declarations rendered by the International Commission of Zoological Nomenclature.</em> 20(25): 277-282., available online at https://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/34655540
note: Multi-word names of Boys & Walker are rejected, including some for Serpula [details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 
From editor or global species database
Authority the name incurvata has a confusing history, and has been attributed to Fleming, Turton, Montagu or Walker. Mentioned by Mörch (1863: 463) as Spirorbis incurvatus (Walker, 1784) = Caecum (Vermiculum) incurvatum Mtg [Montagu, 1803, as Vermiculum], it was attributed by Jeffreys (1867: 79) to Caecum glabrum. Walker http://ia331436.us.archive.org/2/items/collectionofminu00walk/collectionofminu00walk.pdf is not binomial, and not available as author. The earliest binomial author known is Turton, 1802. Walker's figure 11 is clearly a spirorbid, not a Caecum!

Updated by G. Read (May 2018) as follows: Adams (1798) is the author, and he is cited as such by Turton (1802). The "Walker" connection (mostly seen as the non-existent Walker & Jacob 1798) is to Boys and Walker (1784), a non-binonimal work rejected for nomenclature by ICZN Opinion 558 of 1959, where several somewhat different Serpula descriptive Latin names appeared. Adams took those names and the figures and published his own altered (mostly binominal) names with copies of the figures. He could have had no idea that the Boys & Walker (1784) names would ultimately be rejected for nomenclature 160 years later! [details]