Hydrozoa name details

Clytia hummelincki (Leloup, 1935)

225740  (urn:lsid:marinespecies.org:taxname:225740)

 unaccepted
Species
Laomedea hummelincki Leloup, 1935 · unaccepted (basionym)
marine, terrestrial
(of Laomedea hummelincki Leloup, 1935) Leloup, E. (1935). Hydraires calyptoblastiques des Indes Occidentales. (Zoologische Ergebnisse einer Reise nach Bonaire, Curaçao und Aruba im Jahre 1930, No. 13). <em>Mémoires du Musée Royal d'Histoire Naturelle de Belgique.</em> 2: 1-73.
page(s): 19, fig. 7 [details]  Available for editors  PDF available 
Taxonomic remark The nominal species
C. hummelincki is, very likely, nothing more than a junior
synonym of Campanularia brevithecata...  
Taxonomic remark The nominal species
C. hummelincki is, very likely, nothing more than a junior
synonym of Campanularia brevithecata Thornely, 1900.
Colonies of the latter form simple, unbranched stems,
annulated basally and occasionally elsewhere, and are
provided distally with a characteristic spherule below a
very shallow hydrotheca. All these are features met with
in Leloup’s species. In addition, nothing distinguishes
the shape of the gonotheca illustrated by Thornely from
those examined by Millard (1975) in her material from
the Indian Ocean assigned to C. hummelincki. Moreover,
the presence in each gonotheca of C. brevithecata of one
or two gonophores with four radial canals (there is no
mention of discernible gonads), is in conformity with
several convergent observations on C. hummelincki
(Millard, 1975; Gravili et al., 2008; present study). It is
obvious that the occurrence of a subhydrothecal spherule
and the lack of knowledge of the nature of the gonophores
mislead Thornely with respect to the genus in which she
included her new species. [details]

Taxonomic remark The hydroid of Clytia brevithecata (Thornely, 1900), type locality Papua New Guinea, appears
indistinguishable...  
Taxonomic remark The hydroid of Clytia brevithecata (Thornely, 1900), type locality Papua New Guinea, appears
indistinguishable morphologically from that of Clytia hummelincki (Leloup, 1935), type locality Bonaire, in the
Caribbean Sea. Both have very shallow, cup-shaped hydrothecae with an entire margin, a subhydrothecal spherule,
and unbranched pedicels with annulations at the base and occasionally elsewhere. Their gonothecae also seem indistinguishable.
Connections between Indo-Pacific and Atlantic populations appear to exist, given Millard’s (1966a,
1975) record of C. hummelincki from Agulhas Bank at the southern tip of Africa. Based on morphology, the two are
taken to be conspecific, with the name C. brevithecata having nomenclatural priority. Galea & Ferry (2015:
241) had suggested earlier that the two might be conspecific. [details]
Schuchert, P. (2022). World Hydrozoa Database. Clytia hummelincki (Leloup, 1935). Accessed at: https://www.marinespecies.org/hydrozoa/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=225740 on 2022-07-07
Date
action
by
2006-04-19 09:58:39Z
created
2008-01-16 10:35:54Z
changed
2010-12-10 12:51:00Z
changed
2021-12-24 11:00:09Z
changed

original description  (of Laomedea hummelincki Leloup, 1935) Leloup, E. (1935). Hydraires calyptoblastiques des Indes Occidentales. (Zoologische Ergebnisse einer Reise nach Bonaire, Curaçao und Aruba im Jahre 1930, No. 13). <em>Mémoires du Musée Royal d'Histoire Naturelle de Belgique.</em> 2: 1-73.
page(s): 19, fig. 7 [details]  Available for editors  PDF available 

context source (Introduced species) Katsanevakis, S.; Bogucarskis, K.; Gatto, F.; Vandekerkhove, J.; Deriu, I.; Cardoso A.S. (2012). Building the European Alien Species Information Network (EASIN): a novel approach for the exploration of distributed alien species data. <em>BioInvasions Records.</em> 1: 235-245., available online at http://easin.jrc.ec.europa.eu [details]  Available for editors  PDF available 

context source (Deepsea) Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) of UNESCO. The Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS), available online at http://www.iobis.org/ [details]   

context source (Bermuda) Calder, D. R. (1990). Shallow-water hydroids of Bermuda: the Thecatae, exclusive of Plumularioidea. Royal Ontario Museum Life Sciences Contributions , 154 [details]   

context source (Hexacorallia) Fautin, Daphne G. (2013). Hexacorallians of the World. (look up in IMIS[details]   

basis of record Govindarajan, A.F.; Boero, F.; Halanych, K.M. (2006). [Phylogenetic analysis with multiple markers indicates repeated loss of the adult medusa stage in Campanulariidae (Hydrozoa, Cnidaria)]. <i>Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 38</i>: 820-834 (look up in IMIS[details]   

additional source Streftaris, N.; Zenetos, A.; Papathanassiou, E. (2005). Globalisation in marine ecosystems: the story of non-indigenous marine species across European seas. <em>Oceanogry and Marine Biology: an Annual Review.</em> 43: 419-453. (look up in IMIS[details]  Available for editors  PDF available 

additional source Zenetos, A.; Çinar, M.E.; Pancucci-Papadopoulou, M.A.; Harmelin, J.-G.; Furnari, G.; Andaloro, F.; Bellou, N.; Streftaris, N.; Zibrowius, H. (2005). Annotated list of marine alien species in the Mediterranean with records of the worst invasive species. <em>Mediterranean Marine Science.</em> 6 (2): 63-118., available online at https://www.researchgate.net/publication/273213810_Annotated_list_of_marine_alien_species_in_the_Mediterranean_with_records_of_the_worst_invasive_species [details]  Available for editors  PDF available 

additional source Vervoort, W.; Schuchert, P. & van der Land, J. (2000-2007). as a contribution to UNESCO-IOC Register of Marine Organisms. (look up in IMIS[details]   

additional source Calder, D. R. and S. D. Cairns. 2009. Hydroids (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa) of the Gulf of Mexico, Pp. 381–394 in Felder, D.L. and D.K. Camp (eds.), Gulf of Mexico–Origins, Waters, and Biota. Biodiversity. Texas A&M Press, College Station, Texas. [details]   

additional source Occhipinti-Ambrogi, A., A. Marchini, G. Cantone, A. Castelli, C. Chimenz, M. Cormaci, C. Froglia, G. Furnari, M.C. Gambi, G. Giaccone, A. Giangrande, C. Gravil, F. Mastrototaro, C. Mazziotti, L. Orsi-Relini & S. Piraino. (2010). Alien species along the Italian coasts: an overview. <em>Biological Invasions.</em> 13(1): 215-237., available online at https://doi.org/10.1007/s10530-010-9803-y [details]  Available for editors  PDF available 

additional source Zenetos, A.; Gofas, S.; Verlaque, M.; Cinar, M.; Garcia Raso, J.; Bianchi, C.; Morri, C.; Azzurro, E.; Bilecenoglu, M.; Froglia, C.; Siokou, I.; Violanti, D.; Sfriso, A.; San Martin, G.; Giangrande, A.; Katagan, T.; Ballesteros, E.; Ramos-Espla, A.; Mastrototaro, F.; Ocana, O.; Zingone, A.; Gambi, M.; Streftaris, N. (2010). Alien species in the Mediterranean Sea by 2010. A contribution to the application of European Union's Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). Part I. Spatial distribution. <em>Mediterranean Marine Science.</em> 11(2): 381-493., available online at https://doi.org/10.12681/mms.87 [details]  OpenAccess publication 

additional source Corriero, G.; Pierri, C.; Accoroni, S.; Alabiso, G.; Bavestrello, G.; Barbone, E.; Bastianini, M.; Bazzoni, A. M.; Bernardi Aubry, F.; Boero, F.; Buia, M. C.; Cabrini, M.; Camatti, E.; Cardone, F.; Cataletto, B.; Cattaneo Vietti, R.; Cecere, E.; Cibic, T.; Colangelo, P.; De Olazabal, A.; D'onghia, G.; Finotto, S.; Fiore, N.; Fornasaro, D.; Fraschetti, S.; Gambi, M. C.; Giangrande, A.; Gravili, C.; Guglielmo, R.; Longo, C.; Lorenti, M.; Lugliè, A.; Maiorano, P.; Mazzocchi, M. G.; Mercurio, M.; Mastrototaro, F.; Mistri, M.; Monti, M.; Munari, C.; Musco, L.; Nonnis-Marzano, C.; Padedda, B. M.; Patti, F. P.; Petrocelli, A.; Piraino, S.; Portacci, G.; Pugnetti, A.; Pulina, S.; Romagnoli, T.; Rosati, I.; Sarno, D.; Satta, C. T.; Sechi, N.; Schiaparelli, S.; Scipione, B.; Sion, L.; Terlizzi, A.; Tirelli, V.; Totti, C.; Tursi, A.; Ungaro, N.; Zingone, A.; Zupo, V.; Basset, A. (2015). Ecosystem vulnerability to alien and invasive species: a case study on marine habitats along the Italian coast., available online at https://doi.org/10.1002/aqc.2550 [details]  Available for editors  PDF available 

redescription Galea, H. R. (2008). On a collection of shallow-water hydroids (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa) from Guadeloupe and Les Saintes, French Lesser Antilles. <em>Zootaxa.</em> 17: 1-54., available online at http://www.mapress.com/zootaxa/2008/2/zt01878p054.pdf
page(s): 18, fig. 3R-S [details]   

redescription Calder, D. R. 1991. Shallow-water hydroids of Bermuda: the Thecatae, exclusive of Plumularioidea. - Royal Ontario Museum Life Sciences Contributions 154: 1-140.
page(s): 61, fig. 33 [details]   

status source Calder, D. R.; Faucci, A. (2021). Shallow water hydroids (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa) from the 2002 NOWRAMP cruise to the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. <em>Zootaxa.</em> 5085(1): 1-73., available online at https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.5085.1.1
page(s): 16 [details]  Available for editors  PDF available 
 
 Present  Inaccurate  Introduced: alien  Containing type locality 
    Definitions

From editor or global species database
Taxonomic remark The nominal species
C. hummelincki is, very likely, nothing more than a junior
synonym of Campanularia brevithecata Thornely, 1900.
Colonies of the latter form simple, unbranched stems,
annulated basally and occasionally elsewhere, and are
provided distally with a characteristic spherule below a
very shallow hydrotheca. All these are features met with
in Leloup’s species. In addition, nothing distinguishes
the shape of the gonotheca illustrated by Thornely from
those examined by Millard (1975) in her material from
the Indian Ocean assigned to C. hummelincki. Moreover,
the presence in each gonotheca of C. brevithecata of one
or two gonophores with four radial canals (there is no
mention of discernible gonads), is in conformity with
several convergent observations on C. hummelincki
(Millard, 1975; Gravili et al., 2008; present study). It is
obvious that the occurrence of a subhydrothecal spherule
and the lack of knowledge of the nature of the gonophores
mislead Thornely with respect to the genus in which she
included her new species. [details]

Taxonomic remark The hydroid of Clytia brevithecata (Thornely, 1900), type locality Papua New Guinea, appears
indistinguishable morphologically from that of Clytia hummelincki (Leloup, 1935), type locality Bonaire, in the
Caribbean Sea. Both have very shallow, cup-shaped hydrothecae with an entire margin, a subhydrothecal spherule,
and unbranched pedicels with annulations at the base and occasionally elsewhere. Their gonothecae also seem indistinguishable.
Connections between Indo-Pacific and Atlantic populations appear to exist, given Millard’s (1966a,
1975) record of C. hummelincki from Agulhas Bank at the southern tip of Africa. Based on morphology, the two are
taken to be conspecific, with the name C. brevithecata having nomenclatural priority. Galea & Ferry (2015:
241) had suggested earlier that the two might be conspecific. [details]