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Polychaeta taxon details

Aonides Claparède, 1864

129605  (urn:lsid:marinespecies.org:taxname:129605)

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marine, brackish, fresh, terrestrial
recent only
feminine
Claparède, Édouard. (1864). Glanures zootomiques parmi les annélides de Port-Vendres (Pyrénées Orientales). <em>Mémoires de la Société de Physique et d'Histoire Naturelle de Genève.</em> 17(2): 463-600, plates I-VIII., available online at https://doi.org/10.5962/bhl.title.1972
page(s): 505 [details]   
Etymology Authors, none of whom have treated Aonides as masculine, may have assumed 'Aonides' was derived from the collective name...  
Etymology Authors, none of whom have treated Aonides as masculine, may have assumed 'Aonides' was derived from the collective name for the female Muses from Mount Helicon in Aonia, an earlier name for Boeotia, and thus have treated Aonides as feminine, although the current code requires '-ides' names to be treated as masculine if other indications (eg from the type species) are lacking. Claparède's intention for construction of Aonides (see earlier note) indicates it is a modification from the disused genus 'Aonis'. Foster (1971 65) states the genus Aonides gender is feminine and named for the Boeotian women muses. This seems to be correct, as 'Aonis' of Savigny should have the same etymological origin (Aonis is a Boeotian woman), and Audouin & Milne Edwards' later adoption of Savigny's name clearly treats their Aonis as feminine, as their adjectival species name is Aonis foliosa. Thus it does not matter if Aonides Claparède is a direct reference to the Greek mythological female muses or (more likely) is derived secondarily from the feminine genus Aonis as the result should happily be the same. The genus Aonides of Claparède is intended to be feminine. [details]

Etymology Not stated. The generic name Aonides is composed by the name of the genus Aonis sensu Audouin & Milne Edwards, 1833 [not...  
Etymology Not stated. The generic name Aonides is composed by the name of the genus Aonis sensu Audouin & Milne Edwards, 1833 [not Savigny, 1822], followed by the Greek suffix -ides, meaning 'son of' or 'descendant of', probably making reference to the similarity between the two genera, according to Claparède (1864: 505): ''Ce genre est voisin des Aonis Sav.; mais il s'en distingue immédiatement par l'absence du tentacle céphalique impair et subulé, et par la condensation des branchies sur les segments de la partie antérieure du corps.'' [details]
Read, G.; Fauchald, K. (Ed.) (2024). World Polychaeta Database. Aonides Claparède, 1864. Accessed at: https://www.marinespecies.org/polychaeta/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=129605 on 2024-02-29
Date
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by
2004-12-21 15:54:05Z
created
2008-03-26 11:36:43Z
changed
2016-05-29 12:39:25Z
changed
2023-05-10 23:44:27Z
changed

original description Claparède, Édouard. (1864). Glanures zootomiques parmi les annélides de Port-Vendres (Pyrénées Orientales). <em>Mémoires de la Société de Physique et d'Histoire Naturelle de Genève.</em> 17(2): 463-600, plates I-VIII., available online at https://doi.org/10.5962/bhl.title.1972
page(s): 505 [details]   

additional source Glasby, Christopher J.; Read, Geoffrey B.; Lee, Kenneth E.; Blakemore, R.J.; Fraser, P.M.; Pinder, A.M.; Erséus, C.; Moser, W.E.; Burreson, E.M.; Govedich, F.R.; Davies, R.W.; Dawson, E.W. (2009). Phylum Annelida: bristleworms, earthworms, leeches. <em>[Book chapter].</em> Chapt 17, pp. 312-358. in: Gordon, D.P. (Ed.) (2009). New Zealand inventory of biodiversity: 1. Kingdom Animalia: Radiata, Lophotrochozoa, Deuterostomia. Canterbury University Press, Christchurch. [details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 

additional source Fauchald, K. (1977). The polychaete worms, definitions and keys to the orders, families and genera. <em>Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County: Los Angeles, CA (USA), Science Series.</em> 28:1-188., available online at http://www.vliz.be/imisdocs/publications/123110.pdf [details]   

additional source Bellan, G. (2001). Polychaeta, <i>in</i>: Costello, M.J. <i>et al.</i> (Ed.) (2001). European register of marine species: a check-list of the marine species in Europe and a bibliography of guides to their identification. <em>Collection Patrimoines Naturels.</em> 50: 214-231. (look up in IMIS)
note: checklist listing [details]   
From editor or global species database
Diagnosis Original diagnosis by Claparède (1864: 505): ''Tête conique, pourvue de deux antennes occipitales rudimentaires; pas de tentacules buccaux; pieds biramés, la rame dorsale munie d'un lobe lamelleux; partie antérieure du corps seule portant des branchies ligulées.'' [details]

Etymology Authors, none of whom have treated Aonides as masculine, may have assumed 'Aonides' was derived from the collective name for the female Muses from Mount Helicon in Aonia, an earlier name for Boeotia, and thus have treated Aonides as feminine, although the current code requires '-ides' names to be treated as masculine if other indications (eg from the type species) are lacking. Claparède's intention for construction of Aonides (see earlier note) indicates it is a modification from the disused genus 'Aonis'. Foster (1971 65) states the genus Aonides gender is feminine and named for the Boeotian women muses. This seems to be correct, as 'Aonis' of Savigny should have the same etymological origin (Aonis is a Boeotian woman), and Audouin & Milne Edwards' later adoption of Savigny's name clearly treats their Aonis as feminine, as their adjectival species name is Aonis foliosa. Thus it does not matter if Aonides Claparède is a direct reference to the Greek mythological female muses or (more likely) is derived secondarily from the feminine genus Aonis as the result should happily be the same. The genus Aonides of Claparède is intended to be feminine. [details]

Etymology Not stated. The generic name Aonides is composed by the name of the genus Aonis sensu Audouin & Milne Edwards, 1833 [not Savigny, 1822], followed by the Greek suffix -ides, meaning 'son of' or 'descendant of', probably making reference to the similarity between the two genera, according to Claparède (1864: 505): ''Ce genre est voisin des Aonis Sav.; mais il s'en distingue immédiatement par l'absence du tentacle céphalique impair et subulé, et par la condensation des branchies sur les segments de la partie antérieure du corps.'' [details]

Grammatical gender Feminine. See the etymology notes for a full discussion of some complexities [details]