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Ben Rais Lasram, F.; Mouillot, D. (2008). Increasing southern invasion enhances congruence between endemic and exotic Mediterranean fish fauna. Biological Invasions. 11(3): 697-711.
196119
10.1007/s10530-008-9284-4 [view]
Ben Rais Lasram, F.; Mouillot, D.
2008
Increasing southern invasion enhances congruence between endemic and exotic Mediterranean fish fauna
Biological Invasions
11(3): 697-711
Publication
Available for editors  PDF available
Species movements in relation with global warming may increase the spatial overlap between exotic and endemic species, which is a critical issue for the conservation of biodiversity. The Mediterranean Sea, which is a receptacle for exotic species while being a hotspot for endemism, provides exceptional material for a case study. The aim of our study was to quantify (i) the increasing invasion from congruence. The results revealed (i) an acceleration of successful introductions from the Red Sea and (ii) the introduction of Atlantic species from lower latitudes in correlation with the increasing temperature of the Mediterranean Sea. We also showed an increasing overlap between the spatial distributions of endemic and exotic species richness. Taken together, our results suggest that endemic fish species are facing a growing number of exotic species because the Mediterranean Sea is acting as a catchment basin for southern species. southern fish exotic species (Red Sea and Atlantic Ocean) that the Mediterranean biota is experiencing and (ii) the spatial overlap between exotic and endemic Mediterranean fish fauna following the northward movement of exotic species within the Mediterranean Sea in the context of global warming. The historical invasion dynamic of exotic fish species and the sea surface temperature series were reconstructed from 1810 to 2006 in order to estimate the correlation between invasion rate and climate. The geographical distributions of exotic and endemic fish richness before and after the period of global warming were used to assess the dynamic of spatial congruence. The results revealed (i) an acceleration of successful introductions from the Red Sea and (ii) the introduction of Atlantic species from lower latitudes in correlation with the increasing temperature of the Mediterranean Sea. We also showed an increasing overlap between the spatial distributions of endemic and exotic species richness. Taken together, our results suggest that endemic fish species are facing a growing number of exotic species because the Mediterranean Sea is acting as a catchment basin for southern species.
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Acanthurus monroviae Steindachner, 1876 (additional source)
Atherinomorus lacunosus (Forster, 1801) (additional source)
Autisthes puta (Cuvier, 1829) accepted as Terapon puta Cuvier, 1829 (additional source)
Carcharhinus acarenatus Moreno & Hoyos, 1983 accepted as Carcharhinus brachyurus (Günther, 1870) (additional source)
Carcharhinus altimus (Springer, 1950) (additional source)
Carcharhinus falciformis (Müller & Henle, 1839) (additional source)
Centrolabrus exoletus (Linnaeus, 1758) (additional source)
Chilomycterus spilostylus Leis & Randall, 1982 accepted as Cyclichthys spilostylus (Leis & Randall, 1982) (additional source)
Coryogalops ochetica (Norman, 1927) accepted as Coryogalops ocheticus (Norman, 1927) (additional source)
Crenidens crenidens (Forsskål, 1775) (additional source)
Dasyatis uarnak (Gmelin, 1789) accepted as Himantura uarnak (Gmelin, 1789) (additional source)
Dollfusichthys sinusarabici Chabanaud, 1931 accepted as Cynoglossus sinusarabici (Chabanaud, 1931) (additional source)
Dussumieria elopsoides Bleeker, 1849 (additional source)
Enchelycore anatina (Lowe, 1838) (additional source)
Entelurus aequoraeus (Linnaeus, 1758) accepted as Entelurus aequoreus (Linnaeus, 1758) (additional source)
Ephippion guttiferum (Bennett, 1831) accepted as Ephippion guttifer (Bennett, 1831) (additional source)
Fistularia commersonii Rüppell, 1838 (additional source)
Fistularia petimba Lacepède, 1803 (additional source)
Galeocerdo cuvier (Péron & Lesueur, 1822) (additional source)
Galeus atlanticus (Vaillant, 1888) (additional source)
Hemiramphus far (Forsskål, 1775) (additional source)
Heniochus intermedius Steindachner, 1893 (additional source)
Herklotsichthys punctatus (Rüppell, 1837) (additional source)
Hippocampus fuscus Rüppell, 1838 accepted as Hippocampus kuda Bleeker, 1852 (additional source)
Holocentrum rubrum (Forsskål, 1775) accepted as Sargocentron rubrum (Forsskål, 1775) (additional source)
Hyporhamphus affinis (Günther, 1866) (additional source)
Lagocephalus sceleratus (Gmelin, 1789) (additional source)
Lagocephalus spadiceus (Richardson, 1845) (additional source)
Lagocephalus suezensis Clark & Gohar, 1953 (additional source)
Leiognathus klunzingeri (Steindachner, 1898) accepted as Equulites klunzingeri (Steindachner, 1898) (additional source)
Lipophrys pholis (Linnaeus, 1758) (additional source)
Liza carinata (Valenciennes, 1836) accepted as Planiliza carinata (Valenciennes, 1836) (additional source)
Lutjanus argentimaculatus (Forsskål, 1775) (additional source)
Muraenesox cinereus (Forsskål, 1775) (additional source)
Nemipterus japonicus (Bloch, 1791) (additional source)
Omobranchus punctatus (Valenciennes, 1836) (additional source)
Oxyurichthys papuensis (Valenciennes, 1837) (additional source)
Papilloculiceps longiceps (Cuvier, 1829) (additional source)
Parexocoetus mento (Valenciennes, 1847) (additional source)
Pelates quadrilineatus (Bloch, 1790) (additional source)
Petroscirtes ancylodon Rüppell, 1835 (additional source)
Pinguipes brasilianus Cuvier, 1829 (additional source)
Pisodonophis semicinctus (Richardson, 1848) (additional source)
Platycephalus indicus (Linnaeus, 1758) (additional source)
Plotosus lineatus (Thunberg, 1787) (additional source)
Pomadasys stridens (Forsskål, 1775) (additional source)
Priacanthus hamrur (Forsskål, 1775) (additional source)
Pristis pectinata Latham, 1794 (additional source)
Pteragogus pelycus Randall, 1981 (additional source)
Pterois miles (Bennett, 1828) (additional source)
Rachycentron canadum (Linnaeus, 1766) (additional source)
Rastrelliger kanagurta (Cuvier, 1816) (additional source)
Rhabdosargus haffara (Forsskål, 1775) (additional source)
Rhizoprionodon acutus (Rüppell, 1837) (additional source)
Rhynchoconger trewavasae Ben-Tuvia, 1993 (additional source)
Scarus ghobban Forsskål, 1775 (additional source)
Scomberomorus commerson (Lacepède, 1800) (additional source)
Seriola fasciata (Bloch, 1793) (additional source)
Seriola rivoliana Valenciennes, 1833 (additional source)
Siganus luridus (Rüppell, 1829) (additional source)
Siganus rivulatus Forsskål & Niebuhr, 1775 (additional source)
Silhouetta aegyptia (Chabanaud, 1933) accepted as Silhouettea aegyptia (Chabanaud, 1933) (additional source)
Sillago sihama (Forsskål, 1775) (additional source)
Sorsogona prionota (Sauvage, 1873) (additional source)
Sphoeroides pachygaster (Müller & Troschel, 1848) (additional source)
Sphyraena chrysotaenia Klunzinger, 1884 (additional source)
Sphyraena flavicauda Rüppell, 1838 (additional source)
Spratelloides delicatulus (Bennett, 1832) (additional source)
Squalus megalops (MacLeay, 1881) (additional source)
Stephanolepis diaspros Fraser-Brunner, 1940 (additional source)
Synaptura lusitanica de Brito Capello, 1868 accepted as Dagetichthys lusitanicus (de Brito Capello, 1868) (additional source)
Tetrosomus gibbosus (Linnaeus, 1758) (additional source)
Torpedo fuscomaculata Peters, 1855 (additional source)
Torquigener flavimaculosus Hardy & Randall, 1983 (additional source)
Trachyscorpia cristulata (Goode & Bean, 1896) (additional source)
Tylerius spinosissimus (Regan, 1908) (additional source)
Tylosurus choram (Rüppell, 1837) (additional source)
Upeneus pori Ben-Tuvia & Golani, 1989 (additional source)