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Deep-Sea taxon details

Fungiidae Dana, 1846

196100  (urn:lsid:marinespecies.org:taxname:196100)

accepted
Family
Fungia Lamarck, 1801 (type by original designation)

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Dana, J.D. (1846-1849). Zoophytes. United States Exploring Expedition during the years 1838-1842. <em>Lea and Blanchard, Philadelphia.</em> 7: 1-740, 61 pls. (1846: 1-120, 709-720; 1848: 121-708, 721-740; 1849: atlas pls. 1-61)., available online at http://www.sil.si.edu/digitalcollections/usexex/navigation/ScientificText/USExEx19_08select.cfm [details]   
Description Most reef fungiids are free-living . The polyps are among the largest of all corals. These solitary forms have a long...  
Description Most reef fungiids are free-living . The polyps are among the largest of all corals. These solitary forms have a long fossil history extending back to the early origins of the Scleractinia. It is therefore likely that the colonial genera have evolved from the solitary ones, rather than the reverse. This theory is supported by the fact that the structure of the septa of each colonial genus has an equivalent in one of the subgenera of Fungia.
As a general rule, corals with one mouth are called solitary and those with many mouths are called colonial, but clearly this distinction is not always well defined, nor is it basic to the structural organisation of several species. Little is known about many very important aspects of the biology of free-living fungiids, especially their population dynamics, food sources and growth rates. One distinct aspect of the daily existence of all but the heaviest fungiids is that they are at least partially mobile. The genera are solitary or colonial, free-living or attached, mostly hermatypic and extant. Colonial genera are derived from solitary genera and each has septo-costal structures corresponding to those of a solitary genus. These septo-costae radiate from the mouth on the upper surface (as septa) and from the centre of the undersurface (as costae). No similar families. (Veron, 1986 <57>). [details]
Hoeksema, B. W.; Cairns, S. (2024). World List of Scleractinia. Fungiidae Dana, 1846. Accessed through: Glover, A.G.; Higgs, N.; Horton, T. (2024) World Register of Deep-Sea species (WoRDSS) at: https://marinespecies.org/deepsea/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=196100 on 2024-02-23
Glover, A.G.; Higgs, N.; Horton, T. (2024). World Register of Deep-Sea species (WoRDSS). Fungiidae Dana, 1846. Accessed at: https://marinespecies.org/deepsea/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=196100 on 2024-02-23
Date
action
by
2005-12-27 19:49:34Z
created
2013-01-22 10:22:55Z
changed
2022-05-14 09:41:15Z
changed
2023-12-09 16:57:16Z
changed

original description Dana, J.D. (1846-1849). Zoophytes. United States Exploring Expedition during the years 1838-1842. <em>Lea and Blanchard, Philadelphia.</em> 7: 1-740, 61 pls. (1846: 1-120, 709-720; 1848: 121-708, 721-740; 1849: atlas pls. 1-61)., available online at http://www.sil.si.edu/digitalcollections/usexex/navigation/ScientificText/USExEx19_08select.cfm [details]   

basis of record Hoeksema BW. (1989). Taxonomy, phylogeny and biogeography of mushroom corals (Scleractinia: Fungiidae. <em>Zoologische Verhandelingen, Leiden.</em> 254: 1-295., available online at http://www.repository.naturalis.nl/document/149013 [details]   

additional source Gittenberger A, Reijnen BT, Hoeksema BW. (2011). A molecularly based phylogeny reconstruction of mushroom corals (Scleractinia: Fungiidae) with taxonomic consequences and evolutionary implications for life history traits. <em>Contributions to Zoology.</em> 80: 107-132., available online at https://brill.com/downloadpdf/journals/ctoz/80/2/article-p107_2.xml [details]   

additional source Wells JW. (1966). Evolutionary development in the scleractinian family Fungiidae. In: Rees WJ (ed.) The Cnidaria and their evolution. <em>Symposium of the Zoological Society of London Academic Press, London.</em> 16: 223–246, pl. 1. [details]   

additional source Veron JEN. (2000). Corals of the World. Vol. 1–3. <em>Australian Institute of Marine Science and CRR, Queensland, Australia.</em>  [details]   
 
 Present  Inaccurate  Introduced: alien  Containing type locality 
From editor or global species database
Diagnosis Corallum monostomatous (solitary) or polystomatous by development of secondary stomata. Corallum zooxantellate, free or attached (on a stalk or encrusting), in some species reproducing by transverse division (autotomy). Corallum wall solid or perforate. Low order septa imperforate, high order septa perforate. Septa laminar and connected laterally by bar-like elements called "compound synapticulae" or "fulturae". Margins of septo-costae variable in shape by simple or complex ornamentation, usually species-specific. Range: Indo-Pacific, shallow water. [details]

From other sources
Description Most reef fungiids are free-living . The polyps are among the largest of all corals. These solitary forms have a long fossil history extending back to the early origins of the Scleractinia. It is therefore likely that the colonial genera have evolved from the solitary ones, rather than the reverse. This theory is supported by the fact that the structure of the septa of each colonial genus has an equivalent in one of the subgenera of Fungia.
As a general rule, corals with one mouth are called solitary and those with many mouths are called colonial, but clearly this distinction is not always well defined, nor is it basic to the structural organisation of several species. Little is known about many very important aspects of the biology of free-living fungiids, especially their population dynamics, food sources and growth rates. One distinct aspect of the daily existence of all but the heaviest fungiids is that they are at least partially mobile. The genera are solitary or colonial, free-living or attached, mostly hermatypic and extant. Colonial genera are derived from solitary genera and each has septo-costal structures corresponding to those of a solitary genus. These septo-costae radiate from the mouth on the upper surface (as septa) and from the centre of the undersurface (as costae). No similar families. (Veron, 1986 <57>). [details]
LanguageName 
Japanese クサビライシ科  [details]
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