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WRiMS taxon details

Watersipora subtorquata (d'Orbigny, 1852)

111592  (urn:lsid:marinespecies.org:taxname:111592)

accepted
Species
marine, brackish, fresh, terrestrial
recent + fossil
Not documented
Bock, P. (2021). World List of Bryozoa. Watersipora subtorquata (d'Orbigny, 1852). Accessed through: Rius, M.; Ahyong, S.; Costello, M. J.; Galil, B. S.; Gollasch, S.; Hutchings, P.; Katsanevakis, S.; Lejeusne, C.; Marchini, A.; Occhipinti, A.; Pagad, S.; Poore, G. C. B; Robinson, T. B.; Sterrer, W.; Turon, X.; Willan, R. C.; Zhan, A. (2021) World Register of Introduced Marine Species (WRiMS) at: http://www.marinespecies.org/introduced/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=111592 on 2021-10-19
Rius, M.; Ahyong, S.; Costello, M. J.; Galil, B. S.; Gollasch, S.; Hutchings, P.; Katsanevakis, S.; Lejeusne, C.; Marchini, A.; Occhipinti, A.; Pagad, S.; Poore, G. C. B; Robinson, T. B.; Sterrer, W.; Turon, X.; Willan, R. C.; Zhan, A. (2021). World Register of Introduced Marine Species (WRiMS). Watersipora subtorquata (d'Orbigny, 1852). Accessed at: https://marinespecies.org/introduced/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=111592 on 2021-10-19
Date
action
by
2004-12-21 15:54:05Z
created
2005-02-01 14:05:18Z
checked
2021-04-13 07:15:23Z
changed

context source (Introduced species) Katsanevakis, S.; Bogucarskis, K.; Gatto, F.; Vandekerkhove, J.; Deriu, I.; Cardoso A.S. (2012). Building the European Alien Species Information Network (EASIN): a novel approach for the exploration of distributed alien species data. <em>BioInvasions Records.</em> 1: 235-245., available online at http://easin.jrc.ec.europa.eu [details]  Available for editors  PDF available 

basis of record Hayward, P.J. (2001). Bryozoa, <B><I>in</I></B>: Costello, M.J. <i>et al.</i> (Ed.) (2001). <i>European register of marine species: a check-list of the marine species in Europe and a bibliography of guides to their identification. Collection Patrimoines Naturels,</i> 50: pp. 325-333 (look up in IMIS[details]   

additional source Gordon, D. P.; Taylor, P. D.; Bigey, F. P. (2009). Phylum Bryozoa: moss animals, sea mats, lace corals. <em>in: Gordon, D.P. (Ed.) (2009). New Zealand inventory of biodiversity: 1. Kingdom Animalia: Radiata, Lophotrochozoa, Deuterostomia.</em> pp. 271-297. [details]   

additional source Winston, J. E. and F. J. Maturo Jr. 2009. Bryozoans (Ectoprocta) of the Gulf of Mexico, Pp. 1147–1164 in Felder, D.L. and D.K. Camp (eds.), Gulf of Mexico–Origins, Waters, and Biota. Biodiversity. Texas A&M Press, College Station, Texas. [details]   

additional source Liu, J.Y. [Ruiyu] (ed.). (2008). Checklist of marine biota of China seas. <em>China Science Press.</em> 1267 pp. (look up in IMIS[details]  Available for editors  PDF available 

biology source Tepolt, C. K. (2014). Adaptation in marine invasion: a genetic perspective. <em>Biological Invasions.</em> 17(3): 887-903., available online at https://doi.org/10.1007/s10530-014-0825-8
note: Here, I review evidence for adaptation in marine invasion, considering both quantitative and genetic studies. [details]  Available for editors  PDF available 
 
 Present  Inaccurate  Introduced: alien  Containing type locality 
 

From regional or thematic species database
Introduced species impact Chinese part of the Eastern Chinese Sea(Marine Region) Water abstraction or nuisance fouling [details]

Introduced species remark South African part of the South Atlantic Ocean (Marine Region) : This species is known from rocks, oyster shells, pilings, floats, oil platforms, ships' hulls, and fouling plates. It is tolerant of copper and mercury antifouling paints and has outcompeted congeneric species in some areas of its introduced range. [details]

Introduced species remark In Bay of Biscay (IHO Sea Area) : This species is known from rocks, oyster shells, pilings, floats, oil platforms, ships' hulls, and fouling plates. It is tolerant of copper and mercury antifouling paints and has outcompeted congeneric species in some areas of its introduced range. [details]

Introduced species remark In Australian part of the Tasman Sea (Marine Region) : This species is known from rocks, oyster shells, pilings, floats, oil platforms, ships' hulls, and fouling plates. It is tolerant of copper and mercury antifouling paints and has outcompeted congeneric species in some areas of its introduced range. [details]

Introduced species remark Mexican part of the Gulf of California (Marine Region) : This species is known from rocks, oyster shells, pilings, floats, oil platforms, ships' hulls, and fouling plates. It is tolerant of copper and mercury antifouling paints and has outcompeted congeneric species in some areas of its introduced range. [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal Madeiran part of the North Atlantic Ocean (Marine Region) Ships: accidental as attached or free-living fouling organisms [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal Chinese part of the Eastern Chinese Sea(Marine Region) Ships: General [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal Galapagos part of the South Pacific Ocean (Marine Region) Ships: accidental as attached or free-living fouling organisms
 [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in United Kingdom part of the English Channel (Marine Region) : Ships: general [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal South African part of the South Atlantic Ocean (Marine Region) : Ships: accidental as attached or free-living fouling organisms
This organism has a short planktonic stage (Gordon and Mawatari 1992; Cohen and Carlton 1995) suggesting that ship fouling is its likeliest mode of transport to most locations.  [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal Mexican part of the Gulf of California (Marine Region) : Ships: accidental as attached or free-living fouling organisms
This organism has a short planktonic stage (Gordon and Mawatari 1992; Cohen and Carlton 1995) suggesting that ship fouling is its likeliest mode of transport to most locations.  [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Bay of Biscay (IHO Sea Area) : Fisheries: accidental with deliberate translocations of fish or shellfish
Most of the collection sites were located near oyster-culture operations, and this species was most likely introduced to Europe with the Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) (Ryland et al. 2009).  [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Australian part of the Tasman Sea (Marine Region) : Ships: accidental as attached or free-living fouling organisms
This organism has a short planktonic stage (Gordon and Mawatari 1992; Cohen and Carlton 1995) suggesting that ship fouling is its likeliest mode of transport to most locations.  [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Spain (Nation) : Shipping [details]

Introduced species vector dispersal in Spain (Nation) : Fisheries: accidental with deliberate translocations of fish or shellfish [details]