WoRMS name details

Favia pallida (Dana, 1846)

207440  (urn:lsid:marinespecies.org:taxname:207440)

 unaccepted > superseded combination (basionym)
Species
Variety Favia pallida var. amplior (Milne Edwards & Haime, 1849) accepted as Dipsastraea pallida (Dana, 1846) (unaccepted > junior subjective synonym)
Variety Favia pallida var. borradailei (Gardiner, 1904) accepted as Dipsastraea favus (Forskål, 1775) (unaccepted > junior subjective synonym)
Variety Favia pallida var. densisepta Chevalier, 1971 accepted as Dipsastraea pallida (Dana, 1846) (unaccepted > junior subjective synonym)
Variety Favia pallida var. distans Chevalier, 1971 accepted as Dipsastraea pallida (Dana, 1846) (unaccepted > junior subjective synonym)
Variety Favia pallida var. doreyensis Milne Edwards & Haime, 1849 accepted as Dipsastraea pallida (Dana, 1846) (unaccepted > junior subjective synonym)
Variety Favia pallida var. intermedia Chevalier, 1971 accepted as Dipsastraea pallida (Dana, 1846) (unaccepted > junior subjective synonym)
Variety Favia pallida var. polygona Chevalier, 1971 accepted as Dipsastraea pallida (Dana, 1846) (unaccepted > junior subjective synonym)
Variety Favia pallida var. regularis Chevalier, 1971 accepted as Dipsastraea pallida (Dana, 1846) (unaccepted > junior subjective synonym)
marine, fresh, terrestrial
(of Astraea (Fissicella) pallida Dana, 1846) Dana, J.D. (1846-1849). Zoophytes. United States Exploring Expedition during the years 1838-1842. <em>Lea and Blanchard, Philadelphia.</em> 7: 1-740, 61 pls. (1846: 1-120, 709-720; 1848: 121-708, 721-740; 1849: atlas pls. 1-61)., available online at http://www.sil.si.edu/digitalcollections/usexex/navigation/ScientificText/USExEx19_08select.cfm [details]   
Note Fiji (Veron, 1986).  
From other sources
Type locality Fiji (Veron, 1986). [details]
Description This is the most variable Favia in terms of calice size, though there is a consistency of pattern despite this. Corallites...  
Description This is the most variable Favia in terms of calice size, though there is a consistency of pattern despite this. Corallites range from 5 mm to just over 1 cm in diameter. Mature corallites from stressed areas fall generally at the smaller end of the range, while those on clear water reef slopes are larger. Calices are irregular in shape, and have raised rims. Septa are widely spaced and irregular. They are visibly fewer in number than similar sized F. speciosa. This is a very abundant coral, being the most common of the Favia. It is seen on reef slopes from 5 to 35 m deep, in clear water, exposed outer reefs as well as in more turbid, back reef environments. It is common on reef flats also and can tolerate salinities of up to 48 parts per thousand. It is common also on reef crests where wave action is not extreme (Sheppard, 1998).
Colonies are massive. Corallites are circular, with calices 6-10 mm in diameter. Septa are widely spaced and irregular. Paliform lobes are usually poorly developed. Colour: pale yellow, cream or green, always with dark-brown or green calices. Abundance: the most common faviid and often a dominant of back reef margins (Veron, 1986).
Colonies dome-shaped, similar to F. favus, but corallites are smaller (usually <10 mm across), flatter and irregualrly rounded. Colour: Polyps a pale cream or green with dark brown or green centres. Habitat: diverse reefs areas (Richmond, 1997). [details]
Hoeksema, B. W.; Cairns, S. (2023). World List of Scleractinia. Favia pallida (Dana, 1846). Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at: https://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=207440 on 2023-02-04
Date
action
by
1997-01-31 16:37:49Z
created
2000-09-28 07:24:50Z
changed
Garcia, Maria
2008-01-16 10:35:54Z
changed
2014-03-16 01:08:52Z
changed
2014-05-27 21:37:37Z
changed
2019-08-30 08:06:35Z
changed
2019-10-20 16:30:51Z
changed
2022-05-15 06:23:49Z
changed

Creative Commons License The webpage text is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License


original description  (of Astraea (Fissicella) pallida Dana, 1846) Dana, J.D. (1846-1849). Zoophytes. United States Exploring Expedition during the years 1838-1842. <em>Lea and Blanchard, Philadelphia.</em> 7: 1-740, 61 pls. (1846: 1-120, 709-720; 1848: 121-708, 721-740; 1849: atlas pls. 1-61)., available online at http://www.sil.si.edu/digitalcollections/usexex/navigation/ScientificText/USExEx19_08select.cfm [details]   

context source (HKRMS) Chan, A. L. K.; Chan, K. K.; Choi, C. L. S.; McCorry, D.; Lee, M. W.; Ang, P. (2005). Field guide to hard corals of Hong Kong. <em>Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department, The Hong Kong SAR Government.</em>  [details]   

context source (Hexacorallia) Fautin, Daphne G. (2013). Hexacorallians of the World. (look up in IMIS[details]   

basis of record Veron JEN. (1986). Corals of Australia and the Indo-Pacific. <em>Angus & Robertson Publishers.</em>  [details]   

additional source Veron JEN, Pichon M, Wijsman-Best M. (1977). Scleractinia of Eastern Australia – Part II. Families Faviidae, Trachyphylliidae. <em>Australian Institute of Marine Science Monograph series.</em> 3: 1-233. [details]   

additional source Hoffmeister, J.E. (1925). Some corals from America Samoa and the Fiji Islands. <em>Papers from the Department of Marine Biology of the Carnegie Institution of Washington.</em> 22: 1-90, pls. 1-23.
page(s): 9, 12, 23 [details]   

additional source Cairns SD, Hoeksema BW, van der Land J. (1999). Appendix: List of extant stony corals. <em>Atoll Research Bulletin.</em> 459: 13-46.
page(s): 29 [details]   

additional source Randall RH. (2003). An annotated checklist of hydrozoan and scleractinian corals collected from Guam and other Mariana Islands. <em>Micronesica.</em> 35-36: 121-137.
page(s): 133 [details]   

additional source Cairns SD, Hoeksema BW, van der Land J. (2007). as a contribution to UNESCO-IOC Register of Marine Organisms. (look up in IMIS[details]   

additional source Liu, J.Y. [Ruiyu] (ed.). (2008). Checklist of marine biota of China seas. <em>China Science Press.</em> 1267 pp. (look up in IMIS[details]  Available for editors  PDF available [request] 

additional source Veron JEN. (2000). Corals of the World. Vol. 1–3. <em>Australian Institute of Marine Science and CRR, Queensland, Australia.</em>  [details]   

additional source Veron JEN. (2002). New species described in Corals of the World. <em>Australian Institute of Marine Science Monograph Series.</em> 11: 1-209.
page(s): 142 [details]   

additional source Scheer G, Pillai CSG. (1974). Report on Scleractinia from the Nicobar Islands. <em>Zoologica, Stuttgart.</em> 42(122): 1-75.
page(s): 9, 45-46, 74 [details]   

additional source Umbgrove JHF. (1940). Madreporaria from the Togian Reefs (Gulf of Tomini, North-Celebes. <em>Zoologische Mededelingen, Leiden.</em> 22: 265-310.
page(s): 268, 270 [details]   

additional source Umbgrove JHF. (1939). Madreporaria from the Bay of Batavia. <em>Zoologische Mededelingen, Leiden.</em> 22: 1-64.
page(s): 6, 9, 17, 27, 28 [details]   

additional source Yabe H, Sugiyama T, Eguchi M. (1936). Recent reef-building corals from Japan and the South Sea Islands under the Japanese mandate. I. <em>The Science reports of the Tôhoku Imperial University, Sendai, 2nd Series (Geologie).</em> Special Volume 1: 1-66, pls. 1-59.
page(s): 2, 29, Pl. XIX [details]   

additional source Yabe H, Sugiyama T. (1935). Revised list of the reef-corals from the Japanese seas and of the fossil reef corals of the raised reefs and the Ryukyu limestone of Japan. <em>Journal of the Geological Society of Japan.</em> 42: 379-403.
page(s): 381, 385, 388, 394 [details]   

additional source Pillai CSG, Scheer G (1976) Report on the stony corals from the Maldive Archipelago. Results of the Xarifa Expedition 1957/58. Zoologica, Stuttgart 43 (126): 1-83, pls. 1-32. [details]   

additional source Chevalier JP (1971) Les Scléractiniaires de la Mélanésie Française (Nouvelle-Caledonie, Iles Chesterfield, Iles Loyauté, Nouvelles Hébrides). I. Expedition Française sur les Récifs Coralliens Nouv.-Calédonie 5: 1-307, pls. 1-38. Paris.  [details]   

additional source Wijsman-Best M (1972) Systematics and ecology of New Caledonian Faviinae (Coelenterata–Scleractinia). Bijdragen tot de Dierkunde 42: 3-90. [details]   

additional source Nemenzo F (1959) Systematic studies on Philippine shallow water scleractinians: II. Suborder Faviida. Natural and Applied Science Bulletin, University of the Philippines 16: 73-135, pls. 1-24.
page(s): 75, 89 [details]   

additional source Pichon, M.; Benzoni, F. (2007). Taxonomic re-appraisal of zooxanthellate Scleractinian Corals in the Maldive Archipelago. <em>Zootaxa.</em> 1441: 21–33.
page(s): 31 [details]   

additional source Faustino LA. (1927). Recent Madreporaria of the Philippine Islands. <em>Bureau of Science Manila Monograph.</em> 22: 1-310, pls. 1-100.
page(s): 40, 132-133 [details]   

additional source Veron JEN, Marsh LM. (1988). Hermatypic corals of Western Australia : records and annotated species list. <em>Records Western Australian Museum Supplement.</em> 29: 1-136., available online at https://doi.org/10.5962/bhl.title.60555
page(s): 28, 98 [details]   

additional source Wijsman-Best M. (1974). Biological results of the Snellius expedition: XXV. Faviidae collected by the Snellius Expedition. I. The genus Favia. <em>Zoologische Mededelingen, Leiden.</em> 48: 249-261, pls. 1-4. [details]   

additional source Pillai CSG. (1972). Stony corals of the seas around India. <em>Proceedings of the First International Symposium on Corals and Coral Reefs, 1969. Marine Biological Association of India Symposium.</em> 5: 191-216.
page(s): 206 [details]   

additional source Boshoff, P.H. (1981). An annotated checklist of Southern Africa Scleractinia. <em>Oceanographic Research Institute Investigational Report, Durban.</em> 49: 1-45.
page(s): 29 [details]   

additional source Umbgrove JHF. (1924). Report on Plistocene and Pliocene corals from Ceram. <em>Geological, Petrographical, and Paleontological Results of explorations carried out from September 1917 till June 1919 in the island of Ceram, Second Series: Palaeontology.</em> 1: 1-22, map, pls. 1-2. [details]   

additional source Randall RH, Myers RF. (1983). The corals. Guide to the Coastal Resources of Guam: Vol. 2. <em>University of Guam Press, Guam, pp. 128.</em>  [details]   

additional source den Hartog, J. C. (1980). Caribbean Shallow Water Corallimorpharia. Zoologische Verhandelingen, (176): 83 pp.
page(s): 70 [details]   

additional source Veron, J. E. N. (2000). Corals of the World, Volume III: Families Mussidae, Faviidae, Trachyphylliidae, Poritidae. Australian Institute of Marine Science. Townsville., volume 3, pp. 490.
page(s): 114-115 [details]   

additional source Ryland, J. S. (1981). Reefs of southwest Viti Levu and their tourism potential. Proceedings of the Fourth International Coral Reef Symposium, 1, 293-298
page(s): 297 [details]   

additional source Maragos, J. E.; Molina, M.; Kenyon, J. (2004). Palmyra Atoll coral data compiled from Townsend Cromwell 2000-2002, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 2000-2001, and Sette 2004 surveys [Table 8]. UNPUBLISHED, UNPUBLISHED [details]   

additional source Maragos, J. E.; Schmerfeld, J. (2004). Coral survey from Howland Island National Wildlife Refuge, 1998-2004 [Table 3]. UNPUBLISHED, Unpublished
page(s): 1 [details]   

additional source Maragos, J. E.; Kenyon, J. (2004). Rose Atoll coral data compiled from US Fish and Wildlife Service 1994, Townsend Cromwell 2002, and Sette 2004 surveys [Table 10]. UNPUBLISHED, Unpublished
page(s): 1 [details]   

additional source Wells JW. (1954). Recent corals of the Marshall Islands: Bikini and nearby atolls, part 2, oceanography (biologic). <em>U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper.</em> 260(I): 385-486.
page(s): 393, 397, 457-458, pls. 173, 174 [details]   

additional source Pillai CSG. (1983). Structure and generic diversity of recent Scleractinia of India. <em>Journal of the Marine Biological Association of India.</em> 25, 1-2, 78-90.
page(s): 86 [details]   

additional source Sheppard, C. R. C. (1985). Fringing reefs in the southern region, Jeddah to Jizan. Fauna of Saudi Arabia, 7, 37-58
page(s): 45 [details]   

additional source Kühlmann, D. H. H. (2006). Die Steinkorallensammlung im Naturhistorischen Museum in Rudolstadt (Thüringen) nebst ökologischen Bemerkungen. Rudolstädter Naturhistorische Schriften, 13, 37-113
page(s): 63, 91, 112 [details]   

additional source Wallace, C. C.; Fellegara, I.; Muir, P. R.; Harrison, P. L. (2009). The scleractinian corals of Moreton Bay, eastern Australia: high latitude, marginal assemblages with increasing species richness. Memoirs of the Queensland Museum, 54, 2
page(s): 2, 10, 15, 20, 58, 60, 61 [details]   

new combination reference Budd AF, Fukami H, Smith ND, Knowlton N. (2012). Taxonomic classification of the reef coral family Mussidae (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Scleractinia). <em>Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society.</em> 166 (3): 465-529., available online at https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1096-3642.2012.00855.x [details]   

new combination reference Vaughan TW. (1918). Some shallow-water corals from Murray Island (Australia), Cocos-Keeling Island, and Fanning Island. <em>Papers from the Department of Marine Biology of the Carnegie Institution of Washington.</em> 9 (213): 49-234, pls. 20-93. [details]  OpenAccess publication 
 
 Present  Inaccurate  Introduced: alien  Containing type locality 
    Definitions

Nontype HLD X2: 127-76, geounit Indian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype HLD X2: 136-14, geounit Indian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype HLD X2: 136-18, geounit Indian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype HLD X2: 136-23, geounit Indian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype HLD X2: 136-30, geounit Indian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype HLD X2: 151-13, geounit Indian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype HLD X2: 151-22, geounit Indian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype HLD X2: 154-15, geounit Indian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype HLD X2: 156-11, geounit Indian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype IGPS 40726, geounit Japanese Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype IGPS 40730, geounit Japanese Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype IGPS 40735, geounit Japanese Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype IGPS 40743, geounit Japanese Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype IGPS 50868, geounit Micronesian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype IGPS 53074, geounit Palau Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype IGPS 56681, geounit Palau Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype MTQ G57847 [details]
Nontype MTQ G57850-51, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype NMSR 8624, geounit Yemeni Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype NMSR 8625, geounit Yemeni Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype NMSR 8929, geounit Kenyan Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype NMSR 8987, geounit Indian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype NMSR K 33 [details]
Nontype WAM 110-74, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 111-74, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 127-74, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 129-74, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 138-78, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 154-177, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 155-77, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 157-77, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 20-72, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 211-73, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 213-83, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 217-83, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 272-74, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 312-77, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 313-77, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 317-77, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 33-78, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 340-85, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 40-72, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 40-88, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 417-81, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 420-81, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 424-81, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 475-77, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 477-77, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 478-77, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 486-77, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 488-77, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 489-77, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 492-77, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 509-84, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 581-81, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 58-81, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 597-78, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 725-86, geounit Ashmore-Cartier Is. [details]
Nontype WAM 79-72, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 802-81, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Nontype WAM 965-81, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Unknown type MTQ G56522, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Unknown type MTQ G57848-49, G57852, geounit Australian Exclusive Economic Zone [details]
Unknown type MTQ G61501 [details]
From editor or global species database
Biology zooxanthellate [details]

From other sources
Description This is the most variable Favia in terms of calice size, though there is a consistency of pattern despite this. Corallites range from 5 mm to just over 1 cm in diameter. Mature corallites from stressed areas fall generally at the smaller end of the range, while those on clear water reef slopes are larger. Calices are irregular in shape, and have raised rims. Septa are widely spaced and irregular. They are visibly fewer in number than similar sized F. speciosa. This is a very abundant coral, being the most common of the Favia. It is seen on reef slopes from 5 to 35 m deep, in clear water, exposed outer reefs as well as in more turbid, back reef environments. It is common on reef flats also and can tolerate salinities of up to 48 parts per thousand. It is common also on reef crests where wave action is not extreme (Sheppard, 1998).
Colonies are massive. Corallites are circular, with calices 6-10 mm in diameter. Septa are widely spaced and irregular. Paliform lobes are usually poorly developed. Colour: pale yellow, cream or green, always with dark-brown or green calices. Abundance: the most common faviid and often a dominant of back reef margins (Veron, 1986).
Colonies dome-shaped, similar to F. favus, but corallites are smaller (usually <10 mm across), flatter and irregualrly rounded. Colour: Polyps a pale cream or green with dark brown or green centres. Habitat: diverse reefs areas (Richmond, 1997). [details]

Type locality Fiji (Veron, 1986). [details]
LanguageName 
English knob coral  [details]
Japanese ウスチャキクメイシ  [details]
To Digital Atlas Of Marine Species & Locations, DAMSL (Favia)
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