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CaRMS taxon details

Leodamas Kinberg, 1866

325863  (urn:lsid:marinespecies.org:taxname:325863)

accepted
Genus
Haploscoloplos Monro, 1933 · unaccepted (subjective synonym)
marine, brackish, fresh, terrestrial
recent only
masculine
Kinberg, J. G. H. (1866). Annulata Nova. Continuatio. [various errantia & sedentaria]. <em>Öfversigt af Königlich Vetenskapsakademiens förhandlingar, Stockholm.</em> 22(4): 239-258., available online at https://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/32339515
page(s): 252 [details]   
Etymology  Kinberg can safely be assumed to have chosen Leodamas as another historic Greek personal name, as was his practice,...  
Etymology  Kinberg can safely be assumed to have chosen Leodamas as another historic Greek personal name, as was his practice, although Blake (2017) has suggested a different imaginative etymology (see below), Kinberg may have been working alphabetically through a Greek dictionary as he also uses Leonnatus and Leocrates in the same work, and many other such names. In Greek history there is Leodamas of Thasos (c. 380 BC), Leocrates was a leading Athenian general of the First Peloponnesian War, and Leonnatus was a Macedonian officer of Alexander the Great. However, Blake (2017: 49) suggested the name could be "formed from Leo, Greek for lion, and dama, Latin for deer [as it] seems likely that Kinberg noticed the branches of the thoracic notopodial lamellae and compared them with antlers of a deer, hence the name." This suggestion is (put politely) not credible (where does the lion fit in?) and should be disregarded. [details]

Taxonomy Blake (2000) treated Leodamas as a full genus because of its heavy thoracic neuropodial spines, which differ from the...  
Taxonomy Blake (2000) treated Leodamas as a full genus because of its heavy thoracic neuropodial spines, which differ from the narrow spines of Scoloplos. A morphology-based cladistic analysis indicated this was justified, however molecular support is not yet tested. Blake (2017) extended the number of species in Leodamas with several new combinations and three new species. His diagnosis of Scoloplos versus Leodamas hinges on relatively minor differences. These are that in Scoloplos thoracic neurochaetae include blunt, inconspicuous uncini, few in number, not in distinct rows; abdominal neuropodia with embedded, non-projecting acicula, and in Leodamas the thoracic neuropodial uncini are large, conspicuous, arranged in one to many distinct vertical rows, with accompanying capillaries few; abdominal neuropodia with projecting aciculae, either thin and inconspicuous or large. The problem is these are somewhat subjective gradational differences with some species (eg Scoloplos cylindrifer) not clearly belonging to either genus. Subsequently Zhadan (2020: 454) did not accept Blake's transfer of several Scoloplos (Blake's group B) to Leodamas in part because Scoloplos remained heterogeneous, and molecular support was lacking for the morphological differences noted by Blake. See Scoloplos (Leodamas) for a number of species not yet assigned to either genus. [details]
Read, G.; Fauchald, K. (Ed.) (2024). World Polychaeta Database. Leodamas Kinberg, 1866. Accessed through: Nozères, C., Kennedy, M.K. (Eds.) (2024) Canadian Register of Marine Species at: https://www.marinespecies.org/carms/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=325863 on 2024-04-23
Nozères, C., Kennedy, M.K. (Eds.) (2024). Canadian Register of Marine Species. Leodamas Kinberg, 1866. Accessed at: https://marinespecies.org/carms/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=325863 on 2024-04-23
Date
action
by
2008-03-14 12:50:56Z
created
2008-03-26 11:36:43Z
changed
2013-01-11 00:49:33Z
changed
2017-01-13 08:36:42Z
changed
2018-09-11 23:23:04Z
changed

original description Kinberg, J. G. H. (1866). Annulata Nova. Continuatio. [various errantia & sedentaria]. <em>Öfversigt af Königlich Vetenskapsakademiens förhandlingar, Stockholm.</em> 22(4): 239-258., available online at https://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/32339515
page(s): 252 [details]   

original description  (of Haploscoloplos Monro, 1933) Monro, C. C. A. (1933). On a collection of Polychaeta from Dry Tortugas, Florida. <em>Annals and Magazine of Natural History.</em> (series 10) 12(69) : 244-269., available online at https://doi.org/10.1080/00222933308655413
page(s): 261 [details]  Available for editors  PDF available 

taxonomy source Blake, James A. (2017). Polychaeta Orbiniidae from Antarctica, the Southern Ocean, the Abyssal Pacific Ocean, and off South America. <em>Zootaxa.</em> 4218(1): 1-145 [monograph]., available online at http://www.biotaxa.org/Zootaxa/article/view/zootaxa.4218.1.1/25653
page(s): 48; note: description of characters and list of species [details]  Available for editors  PDF available 

status source Dean, Harlan K.; Blake, James A. (2015). The Orbiniidae (Annelida: Polychaeta) of Pacific Costa Rica. <em>Zootaxa.</em> 3956(2): 183-198., available online at https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.3956.2.2
note: remarks on Leodamas as full genus [details]  Available for editors  PDF available 

status source Blake, James A. (2000). A new genus and species of polychaete worm (Family Orbiniidae) from methane seeps in the Gulf of Mexico, with a review of the systematics and phylogenetic interrelationships of the genera of Orbiniidae. <em>Cahiers de Biologie Marine.</em> 41(4): 435-450., available online at http://application.sb-roscoff.fr/cbm/
page(s): 448 [details]  Available for editors  PDF available 

status source Zhadan, Anna. (2020). Review of Orbiniidae (Annelida, Sedentaria) from Australia. <em>Zootaxa.</em> 4860(4): 451-502., available online at https://www.biotaxa.org/Zootaxa/article/view/zootaxa.4860.4.1
page(s): 470; note: Rejects the transfer by Blake (2017) of the species he placed in his Leodamas group B. Group B includes species with branchiae on the posterior thoracic chaetigers or anterior abdominal chaetiger (12...  
Rejects the transfer by Blake (2017) of the species he placed in his Leodamas group B. Group B includes species with branchiae on the posterior thoracic chaetigers or anterior abdominal chaetiger (12–40) and thoracic neuropodial uncini in 1–2 vertical rows
 [details]  Available for editors  PDF available 

identification resource Sun, Yue; Sui, Jixing; Li, Xinzheng. (2018). A new species of <i>Leodamas</i> Kinberg, 1866 (Polychaeta: Orbiniidae) from the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea. <em>Acta Oceanologica Sinica.</em> 37(10): 130-135., available online at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13131-018-1313-2
note: Key for species of Leodamas [details]  Available for editors  PDF available 
 
 Present  Inaccurate  Introduced: alien  Containing type locality 
From editor or global species database
Diagnosis According to Blake (2017) Leodamas of Blake Group A (including type species L. verax) have large, conspicuous spines in thoracic neuropodia, in several (3 or more) rows, with few or no accompanying capillaries, and branchiae usually from setigers 4–6. Leodamas of Blake Group B have (less conspicuous) thoracic neuropodial uncini in only 1–2 rows, with similar number of capillaries as there are uncini, and branchiae from posterior thoracic or anterior abdominal setigers. Abdominal neuropodial aciculae tend to be projecting in Leodamas species. Whereas Scoloplos species have few uncini, not conspicuous, not in rows, and abdominal neuropodial aciculae tend to be small and imbedded. [details]

Etymology  Kinberg can safely be assumed to have chosen Leodamas as another historic Greek personal name, as was his practice, although Blake (2017) has suggested a different imaginative etymology (see below), Kinberg may have been working alphabetically through a Greek dictionary as he also uses Leonnatus and Leocrates in the same work, and many other such names. In Greek history there is Leodamas of Thasos (c. 380 BC), Leocrates was a leading Athenian general of the First Peloponnesian War, and Leonnatus was a Macedonian officer of Alexander the Great. However, Blake (2017: 49) suggested the name could be "formed from Leo, Greek for lion, and dama, Latin for deer [as it] seems likely that Kinberg noticed the branches of the thoracic notopodial lamellae and compared them with antlers of a deer, hence the name." This suggestion is (put politely) not credible (where does the lion fit in?) and should be disregarded. [details]

Grammatical gender Not stated but assumed masculine as Leodamas is a male personal name. Past authors have treated Leodamas as masculine. The type species-group name is not helpful as it is assumed to be from the Latin adjective 'verax' (truthful or speaking truly), which has unchanged ending whether masculine, feminine, or neuter, although Blake (2017: 49) assumes it could only be masculine. [details]

Taxonomy Blake (2000) treated Leodamas as a full genus because of its heavy thoracic neuropodial spines, which differ from the narrow spines of Scoloplos. A morphology-based cladistic analysis indicated this was justified, however molecular support is not yet tested. Blake (2017) extended the number of species in Leodamas with several new combinations and three new species. His diagnosis of Scoloplos versus Leodamas hinges on relatively minor differences. These are that in Scoloplos thoracic neurochaetae include blunt, inconspicuous uncini, few in number, not in distinct rows; abdominal neuropodia with embedded, non-projecting acicula, and in Leodamas the thoracic neuropodial uncini are large, conspicuous, arranged in one to many distinct vertical rows, with accompanying capillaries few; abdominal neuropodia with projecting aciculae, either thin and inconspicuous or large. The problem is these are somewhat subjective gradational differences with some species (eg Scoloplos cylindrifer) not clearly belonging to either genus. Subsequently Zhadan (2020: 454) did not accept Blake's transfer of several Scoloplos (Blake's group B) to Leodamas in part because Scoloplos remained heterogeneous, and molecular support was lacking for the morphological differences noted by Blake. See Scoloplos (Leodamas) for a number of species not yet assigned to either genus. [details]
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